Category Archives: Peoples’ Pacte

Draft of a “Peoples’ Covenant for Better World Governance”

We, seek the Peoples of the World, salve

Determined to make full use of the democratic principle that sovereignty derives   from the peoples, cheap

Referring to the United Nations Charter, the paramount international legal  instrument, adopted in San Francisco, United States of America, on June 25th,   1945, which has since been accepted by almost all states,

Noting that the ideas   and goals enshrined in the Charter are far from having been achieved,

Noting in   particular :

– That mankind has not yet been saved from the scourge   of war,

– That the States haven’t been able to maintain   consistent peace and international security,

– That the dignity and worth of human beings and the   principle of equal rights of men and women and of large and small nations are   still being violated,

– That the conditions to guarantee justice and respect   for obligations arising from international law have not yet be fully   established,

–  That the speed in promoting social progress and   better standards of life in freedom should be accelerated, and that inequalities   between individuals and between nations are becoming worse by the prevailing   economic laissez-faire,

– That the environmental situation is steadily   deteriorating and that we are losing biodiversity,

Convinced that basic democratic principles mentioned above give every people the   possibility to guide the action of their state and their government,

We adopt following provisions and principles in form of the “General Peoples’ Covenant for Better World Governance”, in the firm and sovereign intention that all states and governments should comply therewith in all respects and   at all times.

We expect that this Covenant, once adopted under the specific procedures herein set   forth, shall be given binding force at the highest international and national   levels, and that all appropriate necessary measures shall be promptly   implanted by all public authorities concerned.

I – Sovereignty

1. Sovereignty derives from the people, and the   peoples can exercise it directly or through their representatives in   accordance with their respective constitutions and international law.

2. No people can be forced to renounce its sovereignty.

3. Each State, as the institutional embodiment of its   people, is deemed to be sovereign in relation to other states. State   sovereignty shall be exercised in conformity with international law and   international agreements ratified in accordance with the constitution.

4. Sovereignty extends, in particular, to those   aspects related to the social, cultural and economic identity of each nation.

II – Essential values

5. We endorse the six following   fundamental values deemed to be essential to international relations in the   twenty-first century, proclaimed on 8 September 2000 by the United Nations   General Assembly in the United Nations Millennium Declaration. Those values   are: freedom, equality, solidarity, tolerance, respect to nature and shared   responsibility.

III – Peace, the essential common good of each peuple

6. Peace is our essential goal. It is the main duty of our states and governments to maintain and to protect this common good.

7. We hereby remind our states and   governments that they are bound to resolve disputes in accordance with   international law, in particular Article 51 of the Charter of the United   Nations, which prohibits the use of armed force except in the case of   self-defense, individual or collective, when confronted with an armed attack,   or in order to implement the decisions of the Security Council aiming to   restore international peace and security.

8. The illegitimate use of armed force shall be   treated as a violation of national and international law.

9. Except in self defense or in response to a   request of the Security Council approved by the UN General Assembly by a   majority of its members, the sending and maintaining of military personnel   and equipment abroad require the approval of the recipient country.

10. We urge our states and governments to negotiate in good faith in order to achieve   controlled disarmament, starting with nuclear arms and other weapons of mass   destruction.

11. We note in this   connection that the United Nations Security Council, as currently comprised,   is not really representative of the community of peoples.

12. Accordingly, we ask that any Council   decision ordering or authorizing the use of force be immediately submitted   for approval to the UN General Assembly.

13. Generally, we request all states and governments to consider the means of reforming the United   Nations Charter so that all intergovernmental bodies of the Organization,   including the Security Council and the Council of Human Rights – become more efficient   in representing the community of nations.

IV – Fundamental rights

14. We endorse the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, proclaimed by the General   Assembly of the United Nations on December 10th,1948.

V – The economy and money

15. The international community, as well as states   and governments, must assume that economy and money are exclusive to serve   society – not the contrary.

16. We are aware that a number of economic agents, mostly those in charge of handling   money and monetary instruments, ruthlessly exploit their de facto power and   the alleged “law of the market” to obtain benefits out of proportion with the   services rendered, and unduly influence government operations.

17. We affirm that economy   should be managed for the exclusive benefit of the people, due to bitter lessons   of experience, namely:

– The profit motive is no justification for any kind   of economic activity. Since the “law of the market” has again and again   proved to be powerless to regulate the economy, such regulation should be in the   responsibility of states and governments acting jointly;

– Regulation should not result in arbitrarily   stifling individual initiative.

18. All property, tangible and intangible, that is   not privately owned in accordance with the Law should be deemed to be public   property under public management. Furthermore, expropriation based on the   power of eminent domain should be available in accordance with the Law.

19. All services of general interest, including   economic services, that demand equal access, permanent availability and   adaptability to changing public needs, as well as any monopoly, should be   deemed to be in the nature of public services, whether managed by governments   or by private firms. Every people, acting through its state, is entitled to   decide in which way such services should be rendered and whether the power of   expropriation should be used in any given case.

20. Development must be sustainable, in the sense   that it must meet present needs without compromising the ability to satisfy   future needs.

21. Each people should respect other peoples’   property and resources and world environment and, within its means,   contribute to their welfare.

VI – Procedures relating to this Covenant

A. Adoption of the Covenant

22. This covenant is opened for participation by all   peoples. This article recognizes any human community as a people, which is   recognized by at least two states members of the United Nations.

23. The preliminary draft of this Covenant shall be   open for a worldwide debate without any limitation as to participation. To   this end, a multilingual Internet website shall be established.

24. This worldwide debate shall begin on the date   appointed by the absolute majority of the Project Initiators having cast   votes. It will continue until the sponsors will find, also by an absolute   majority of votes cast, that acceptance has reached a certain level to justify   further steps.

25. Any person by the age of 18 may at any time until the end of the debate declare   him or herself project sponsor towards the present Project Initiators.

26. While the debate continues, the sponsors shall   be entitled to adopt by a majority of votes cast such regulations as they   deem necessary.

27. After closing the debate, the sponsors shall   propose a procedure to secure the consent of the peoples regarding the   preliminary draft. The absolute majority of the sponsors must adopt the said   procedure.

B. Entry into force of the Covenant

28. After the consent of at least two people have   been collected in accordance with the procedure referred to in Article 27   above, the Covenant will be deemed to be in force between the said two   peoples.

29. Subsequently, the Covenant shall enter into   force for any people newly consenting on the date on which consent has been   obtained in accordance with article 26 above.

C. Implementation of the Covenant by States and   governments

30. States and governments whose peoples have   adopted this Covenant shall ensure that the Covenant or at least the principles   set forth under I to IV are made a part of their national   laws and international agreements.

 

III – Peace, the essential common good

III – Peace, pills the essential common good

6. Peace is one of our essential goals. It is the main duty of our states and govern­ments to main­taion and to protect this common good.

7. We hereby remind our states and govern­ments that they are bound to resolve dis­putes in accor­dance with inter­na­tional law, sick in par­ti­cular Article 51 of the Charter of the United Nations, which pro­hibits the use of armed force except in the case of self-defense, indi­vidual or col­lective, when confronted with an armed attack, or in order to implement the deci­sions of the Security Council aiming to restore inter­na­tional peace and security.

8. The ille­gi­timate use of armed force shall be treated as a vio­lation of national and inter­na­tional law.

9. We urge our states and govern­ments to nego­tiate in good faith in order to achieve controlled disar­mament, starting with nuclear arms and other weapons of mass destruction.

10. We note in this connection that the United Nations Security Council, as cur­rently com­prised, is not really repre­sen­tative of the com­munity of peoples.

11. Accor­dingly, we ask that any Council decision ordering or autho­rizing the use of force be imme­diately sub­mitted for approval to the UN General Assembly.

12. Gene­rally, we request all states and govern­ments to consider the means of reforming the United Nations Charter so that all inter­go­vern­mental bodies of the Orga­ni­zation, including the Security Council and the Council of Human Rights?–?become effec­tively repre­sen­tative of the com­munity of nations.